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Thursday, April 30, 2009

I am in Love

IS THIS LOVE?

When I first saw you I was afarid to talk to you
When I first talked to you I was afraid to like you
When I first liked you I was afarid to love you
Now that I love you I'm afraid to lose you

I'm not supposed to love you, I'm not supposed to care
I'm not supposed to live my life, wishing you were there
I'm not supposed to wonder where you are or what you do
I'm sorry I just can't help myself, I fell in love with you

I wrote your name in the sand but the waves washed it away
I wrote your name on my hand but I washed it the next day
I wrote your name on a paper but I accidentally threw it away
I wrote your name in my heart and forever it will stay.

Can you take me away and never let me go back?
Can you hold me in your arms and promise everything will be ok?
Can you kiss my lips and make all my problems disapear ?
Can you love me as much as I love you?

From : My Love

Sunday, April 12, 2009

Nasreddin The Wise: Please, Eat Coat!

This story is retold by Sugeng Hariyanto
Nasreddin, The Wise Man


One evening Nasreddin was invited to a party. As a good neighbor, he surely would come to the party. He chose the clothes that looked old.

He chose it because it was his favorite. When he arrived at the party, nobody greeted and welcomed him. Even the host did not offer him any seat. Then he went home quickly. He changed his old clothes with the new and most beautiful one. Then he went back to the party.
At that time, everybody was warm to him. Everybody greeted him with a nice smile. Even the host offered him the best seat and table with the best food and drink.

Nasreddin sat for a while and stood again. Suddenly, he take off his clothes. There were only underclothes left on his body. The other guests were very surprised. So was the host.
He put the coat on the food on the table. He said "Please, eat coat. It's for you".

The other guests were wondering why he did so. One of them asked, "What are you doing, Nasreddin? Are you crazy?"
"No, I'm alright. I'm asking my coat to eat. Do you still remember, when I came here in old clothes nobody greeted me. And the host didn't offer me any seat or food. But when I come with this beautiful coat now, everybody greets me warmly. The host offers me the best food and drink. So, the host gives the food and the drink to my coat, not to me," he answered.

Let's give a bit respect to the Mother Earth


The topic I would like to raise is about water. This topic came into my head when I said to someone "You don't use the water right? so why the tap is still ON?" and the response was "I pay for it so no problem". I was "astonished" to hear that kind of answer.

Many of us who are already pampered with all things exist surround us do not realize the other side of the coin.

The first side of the coin is : There are still many parts of the world around the globe which lack of water. They have to walk miles away to get fresh water or even sometimes they have water but it's not worth consumption.

The other side of the coin is : The other parts of the globe in which water is abundant that it's wasted as if it would be there forever.

"So what???? It's their fate to be born in waterless place, what can we do?"

The answer is "NOTHING". We can't bring the water from New Zealand to Sahara Desert nor We can't create a pea-shooter that will shoot the ice ball from the poles to the dry region.

If you think that way, then you are right but there is one least thing we could do. "Respect the water available for you!!!"
This nature exist for us. It has provided us with all the things we need and the most crucial thing is "water". We can survive without food for say 10 - 14 days (till the last breath) but without water????? Not even 3 days. Most of us don't realize that since we are abundant of it.

All I ask is just a bit of our concern about what is happening in our surrounding. There are still some things you can do the least to show that you are not ignorant about your own standing ground (the mother earth) such as:
1. Check you faucet! Is it leaking or not? Fix it after this if so.
2. When you are brushing your teeth, do you keep the water running? If so, Stop it while you enjoy cleaning your teeth. ON it when you need only.
3. Do you wash your hands with the water running while you are rubbing your hands with the perfumed hand-wash soap? OFF the water tap while you are rubbing them and ON it again when you need it.
4. Do you clean your front yard every morning using hose? If so, use pail because you can control how much water you need (you can't do it if you use water hose). Or if you have to use the hose, try to control the water flow.
5. When you are washing the dishes, do you keep the water running while you are brushing them with dish-washing detergent? Please...OFF it until you are done brushing them.
6. How much clothing do you wash in your washing machine? If not too much, set the water flow to small or medium instead of large.
7. When you water the plants in your garden, try to control the water flow.

Another a bit extreme way:
Some of us here use shower to bathe. Try to control the water flow if you can.

I am not asking you to do all those, especially for those who love water. After a tiring day, staying under the hot-water shower for at least 20 minutes is the best way to recharge yourself...SO DO IT...
OR...you like to wet you boyfriends, girlfriends, siblings at the end of the week when watering the garden together...DO IT....

It's not about doing the best or the 100% right, but it's about giving your best. And in giving the best, there are always some exceptions. Don't blame yourselves for those exceptions, just enjoy it.

I think that's all I am concern to say and the last..keep drinking 2 liters of water everyday. Don't be thrift in that,...water is one of the best brain-food so don't lack it ;-)

Best of Luck! and May the Nature bless us all....

Saturday, April 4, 2009

The Elves and Shoemaker

Retold by : Vera Southgate
Once upon a time, there lived a shoemaker and his wife.
The man was a good shoemaker and he worked hard, yet he and his wife were very poor.
As time went on, they grew poorer and poorer.
At last, the day came when all the shoemaker had left was one piece of leather. It would make only one pair of shoes.

That evening, before he went to bed, the shoemaker cut out a pair of shoes from the leather. Then he left them on his workbench, all ready for him to sew next morning.

As they were going upstairs to bed that night, the shoemaker spoke sadly to his wife. "I have used my last piece of leather," he said. "I have cut out one pair of shoes. Tomorrow I will sew them. When they are sold, I don't know what will become of us."

The next morning, the shoemaker got up early and went into his workshop, ready to make the shoes. on his bench, instead of the leather that he hadl eft cout out, he found a pair of shoes, already made. He was astonished and didn't know what to think.

The shoemaker took the shoes in his hands and looked carefully at them. They were neatly made, with not on bad stitch in them.
He showed the shoes to his wife, who said, "I have never seen a pair of shoes so well-made. They are perfect."
The shoemaker and his wife could not think who had sewn the shoes.
The same morning, a lady came into the shop, to buy a pair of shoes. The shoemaker showed her the pair he had found on his bench. She said "I have never seen such well-made shoes."

The lady tried on the shoes and they fitted her perfectly. She was so pleased with them, that she paid the shoemaker twice the usual price. With the money, the shoemaker was able to buy leather for two pairs of shoes.
That night, before he went to bed, he cut out two pairs of shoes. He left them on his workbench, all ready for him to sew in the next morning.

The next morning, the shoemaker got up early and went into his shop, to make the shoes. But he had no need to do so. On his bench he found the two pairs of shoes, already made.

He took the shoes in his hands and looked carefully at them. Once more he found that they were neatly made, with not one bad stitch in them.

That morning, a man came into the shop, to buy some shoes. The shoemaker showed him the two pairs of shoes he had found on his bench. The main said,"I have never seen such well-made shoes."

He was so pleased with them that he bought both pairs of shoes. He paid the shoemaker twice the usual price. With the money, the shoemaker was able to buy leather for four pairs of shoes. That night, before he went to bed, he cut out four pairs of shoes. He left them on his workbench , all ready for him to sew in the morning. The next morning, the shoemaker got up early and went into his workshop to make the shoes. But he had no need to do so. Again, on his bench , he found four pairs of perfectly made shoes. And so it went on. Every night, the shoemaker cut out some shoes and left them on his workbench.

Every morning, he found the shoes, all neatly made. Many rich customers came to his shop to buy these perfect shoes. So, in time, the shoemaker and his wife become rich.
Yet the shoemaker and his wife still had no idea who made these perfect shoes for them.
One evening, not long before Christmas, when the shoemaker had finished cutting out shoes, he went to his wife.
"We still don't know who sews the shoes for us," he said. "Shall we stay up tonight, to see who it is that helps us?"

His wife thought that this was a very good idea. So she lit a candle and they went into the workshop.
They hid themselves in a corner of the room, behind some clothes which were hanging there.

Then the shoemaker and his wife waited quietly and watched to see what would happen.
For a long time nothing happened. Then, just as the clock struck twelve, the door of the workshop opened quietly.
In came two tiny elves. They were dressed in old clothes and their feet were bare. They didn't see the shoemaker and his wife, who were hiding in the corner, watching them.

The elves jumped on to the workbench and took up the shoes that were cut out. They began to stitch and sew and hammer. They worked so neatly and so quickly that the shoemaker could hardly believe his eyes.

The elves didn't stop for a moment until all the cut-out shoes were finished. Then they ran quickly away.

The next morning, at breakfast, the shoemaker asked his wife, "How can we thank these little elves, who have made us so rich and so happy?"

"I know what we can do", said his wife, "We can make them new clothes and shoes. Their own clothes are ragged and their feet are bare."

During the evenings that followed, the shoemaker and his wife began to make new clothes for the elves.
The shoemaker chose the softest leather he could find. He cut out two of the tiniest pairs of shoes you have ever seen. Then he stitched the shoes as carefully as ever he could.
The shoemaker's wife cut out two white shirts, two small green jackets and two pairs of trousers to match. She sewed them with tiny stitches. She made two little caps, each with a feather in it. She also knitted two pairs of wee white stockings.

By Christmas Eve, the tiny clothes and shoes were finished. The shoemaker cleared the leather and the tools from his workbench. He and his wife laid their presents on the bench, instead of the usual work.
Then they hid themselves, as they had done before, and waited to see what the elves would do.

Just as the clock struck twelve, the door opened quietly, as before. The two elves came running in. They still wore old clothes and their feet were blue with cold. They jumped on to the bench, ready to get to work at once. But there was no leather on the bench, only the tiny clothes.

The elves were astonished, at first, and they they were delighted. In no time at all, they were out of their old clothes. Then, talking and laughing, they dressed themselves in the beautiful new clothes -- the green jacket and trousers, the white shirt and stockings, the soft leather shoes and the little caps, with the feathers that nodded as they laughed.

In their delight, the little elves skipped and jumped over chairs and benches. They they joined hands and danced around, as they sang :

"Now we are boys so fine to see,
We need no longer cobblers be."

At last they danced happily out of the door.

The shoemaker and his wife never saw the little elves again. But, form that time, good luck was always with them. They were rich and happy for the rest of their lives.